5 Foods That Stop Hair Loss

Here’s what science says you can eat to keep your head full of hair

Seeing more strands in your brush than usual? You’re not alone. An estimated 80 million Americans experience male- or female-pattern baldness as they age, and countless others suffer hair loss from conditions like autoimmune disorders, diabetes, vitamin deficiencies, stress, and lack of sleep.

While contending with bald spots and thinning tresses is stressful, there is hope: Research shows that it’s possible to thicken hair back up through dietary changes.

Fill your plate with the following foods, which are rich in proven hair-growth nutrients.

Hair is a protein fiber (as are nails), which means you need to eat protein to grow new strands and keep the existing ones strong. Protein is also required to produce keratin, a key structural component of hair.

A smart choice is marine-based protein, like salmon, which has been shown to boost hair health in women thanks to its omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin content.

HONEY

When used as a topical treatment, honey can improve the look of thinning hair. In a study of patients experiencing seborrheic dermatitis, which includes scaling, itching, and hair loss, those who applied a solution of 90% honey and 10% water to their scalp every other day for 4 weeks reported an improvement in hair loss at the end of the study.

OYSTERS

Zinc seems to be a super nutrient when it comes to preventing and treating hair loss. In one study, researchers compared the zinc levels of 50 people with hair loss due to alopecia areata to 50 healthy controls and found that all of the alopecia patients had significantly lower zinc levels. Another study examined the zinc and copper levels in 312 men and women experiencing hair loss. No matter the cause of the hair loss, all subjects had significantly lower zinc levels than controls.

Fortunately, zinc supplementation and eating plenty of zinc-rich foods can slow hair loss in the majority of these cases, so it’s a good idea to add it to your diet. According to the National Institutes of Health, oysters contain more zinc per serving than any other food. Other food sources of zinc include walnuts, spinach, eggs, sunflower seeds, green peas, wheat germ, oatmeal and chickpeas.

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